Tuesday, March 2, 2010

Out-of-control birds invade Bedok and leave a mess

 Out-of-control birds invade Bedok and leave a mess
STOMPer Carpet Bomber is fed up with the bird population which the STOMPer claims has invaded the market area about Block 85 Bedok.

According to the STOMPer, nothing has been done, even after complaints to the East Coast Town Council.

"I have been living in Bedok for almost a decade, and the bird population is seriously getting out of control.

"They invade the block 85 market, the coffeeshops nearby, pavements, playgrounds, and the HDB area.

"No one cleans the faeces off the pavement.

"There is always the bird waste smell around the neighbourhood, presumably due to the birds.

"I have complained to East Coast Town Council also no use.

"Everyday from 5am - 7am and 5pm - 7pm, there will be a mass gathering of birds and faeces bombardment.

"The birds also pick on food left on table, floor. You name it, they'll eat it. Bedok 85 Market is the worse. They linger on top of stalls. Do their business inside the stalls and tables.

"They are always eyeing your food till you leave.

"The residents here pay conservancy charges every month but it does not seem to be put to good use.

"I really hope that with this posting, this annoying problem will be highlighted and some action will be taken."

 Out-of-control birds invade Bedok and leave a mess
 Out-of-control birds invade Bedok and leave a mess
 Out-of-control birds invade Bedok and leave a mess
 Out-of-control birds invade Bedok and leave a mess
 Out-of-control birds invade Bedok and leave a mess
 Out-of-control birds invade Bedok and leave a mess

Related article: Shocked by pigeon culling? Then stop feeding them (28th February 2010)

I personally adopt a live and let live attitude where it comes to coexisting with birds, even the non-native species such as house crows (Corvus splendens), Javan myna (Acridotheres javanicus) or feral pigeon (Columba livia), but I probably would also be at my wits' end if faced with a similar situation.


House crow;
(Photo by [ benny ])


Javan myna;
(Photo by mjmyap)

Note that some of the problems cited in the post are exacerbated by human behaviours. Giving the birds opportunities to scavenge at food outlets does in a way contribute to the problem. And I would not be surprised if some well-meaning individuals actually deliberately feed the birds.


(Photo by StarvingFox)

Finding an optimal solution is not easy, and might drive the birds away only for them to become a problem again elsewhere. Culling is only a short-term solution, and does not do anything about the factors that enable the bird population to explode in the first place. Exclusion devices can work, but are not feasible everywhere. In order to achieve long term results, it may be best to adopt a variety of measures, that not only control the bird population, but restrict the birds' ability to access feeding, roosting and nesting sites. Public education and changing human behaviour and attitudes are often integral parts of the solution.


Feral pigeon;
(Photo by chauromano)

Culling is never a final solution, since it not only frees up resources for the survivors, enabling them to breed at a faster rate, but it also allows birds to just fly in from surrounding areas to take replace those that have been killed.


(Photo by xtemujin)

I'm not against culling as a control measure, but it should never be the only strategy adopted against controlling animals we perceive to be pests. Far better to adopt mitigating measures that will prevent the birds from undergoing a population boom in the first place, and where possible, non-lethal options should also be explored.

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