Monday, July 4, 2011

Monkey see, monkey do: Monkeys open lids of recycling bins at MacRitchie Park

Monkey see, monkey do: Monkeys open lids of recycling bins at MacRitchie Park

STOMPer MacRitchie caught sight of these monkeys flipping open the lids of recycling bins at MacRitchie Reservoir Park. Are these monkeys being clever or being a nuisance?

A group of monkeys are seen scavenging through the rubbish dump and recycling bins at MacRitchie Reservoir Park.

The monkeys flip open the lids of the recycling bins and leave them wide open, allowing insects and other animals to get into the bins.
Monkey see, monkey do: Monkeys open lids of recycling bins at MacRitchie Park
Monkey see, monkey do: Monkeys open lids of recycling bins at MacRitchie Park
Monkey see, monkey do: Monkeys open lids of recycling bins at MacRitchie Park
Monkey see, monkey do: Monkeys open lids of recycling bins at MacRitchie Park
Monkey see, monkey do: Monkeys open lids of recycling bins at MacRitchie Park
Monkey see, monkey do: Monkeys open lids of recycling bins at MacRitchie Park
Monkey see, monkey do: Monkeys open lids of recycling bins at MacRitchie Park
Monkey see, monkey do: Monkeys open lids of recycling bins at MacRitchie Park

Where it comes to dealing with intelligent creatures like long-tailed macaques (Macaca fascicularis), it's always a battle of wits.

Monkey
Long-tailed macaque licking spilled drink on rubbish bin, Sentosa;
(Photo by chooyutshing)

I previously blogged about macaques raiding rubbish bins here and here. Clearly, even the supposed monkey-proof bins are no match for those smart and/or strong enough to lift the lid. Perhaps they had learned from observation of visitors using these bins?

IMG_4436
Long-tailed macaque scavenging from rubbish bin;
(Photo by Marcus)

I suppose it's time to look into a new design for monkey-proof bins.

1 comment:

Crystal said...

I've also seen this happening at MacRitchie. The bins are supposed to have bungee cords on them to keep them shut, but for some reason they're left off sometimes, and it creates a problem. People who live around MacRitchie should be vigilant about keeping their trash cans secure, but the NParks officials should definitely set the example by making the cans within the nature reserves as secure as possible. That one simple thing can do a lot to minimize human-macaque conflict.